Verona: The Duomo

There is a lot to see in the Duomo complex of Verona. Apart from the cathedral of Santa Maria Assunta, the complex comprises the baptistery of San Giovanni in Fonte, the church of Sant’Elena and the cloister of the canons (Chiostro dei Canonici). The Duomo has the most intelligent staff…

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Verona: San Zeno

The famous Romanesque church of San Zeno is located quite far outside Verona’s city centre. There is a sound historical explanation for this. In Antiquity there was a Roman cemetery here, where somewhere between 372 and 380 the eighth bishop of the city was buried. Little is certain about the…

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Verona: Santa Anastasia

Remarkably, the large basilica of Santa Anastasia in Verona is not dedicated to the eponymous saint. Instead the immense church is dedicated to Saint Peter of Verona, also known as Saint Peter Martyr. This Dominican preacher, inquisitor and persecutor of heretics was murdered by a hired assassin in 1252 and…

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Verona: The Castelvecchio

The famous Castelvecchio (‘old castle’) of Verona was built in a bend of the river Adige. An equally famous bridge, the Ponte di Castelvecchio or Ponte Scaligero, connects it to the other river bank. Both the castle and the bridge were constructed by Cangrande II della Scala, lord of the…

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Verona: San Lorenzo

The beautiful Romanesque church of San Lorenzo is almost completely surrounded by other buildings. People taking a stroll along the Corso Cavour might very well pass by the church without noticing it. Only a Gothic gate topped by a statue of Saint Lawrence with his gridiron and a sign with…

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Verona: San Fermo Maggiore

The splendid church of San Fermo Maggiore is also known as the church of Santi Fermo e Rustico. Fermus (or Firmus) and Rusticus were according to tradition Christians from Bergamo who were martyred in Verona in the year 304. The execution supposedly took place on the shores of the river…

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Vicenza: Teatro Olimpico

Vicenza’s Teatro Olimpico can be counted among the most famous creations of the architect Andrea Palladio (1508-1580). Palladio designed the theatre, but died before it could be completed. It is therefore only fair to see the theatre as a work by his student Vincenzo Scamozzi (1548-1616) as well. Scamozzi not…

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Bardolino: San Severo

On the edge of Bardolino’s small centre, we find the Romanesque church of San Severo. This church should not be confused with the church of San Nicolò e San Severo situated in the centre itself. The latter is a neo-classicist monstrosity that visitors to Bardolino should really skip. The San…

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Veneto: Asolo

Ah, Asolo! This lovely little town in the foothills of the Dolomites was high on our list during our most recent summer holiday in Italy. And yet for some reason we kept procrastinating visiting it until the very last day of that holiday. We were certainly not disappointed when we…

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Vicenza: San Lorenzo

The thirteenth century church of San Lorenzo in Vicenza is of course dedicated to Saint Lawrence the Deacon, martyred in 258 (more information here and here). The church and adjacent monastery have always been administered by members of the Franciscan Order. Now Saint Lawrence is not a typical Franciscan saint…

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Vicenza: The Duomo

The city of Vicenza was known as Vicetia during the Roman era. It seems to have been of relatively minor importance, but its cathedral goes back a long way. By the third century CE, Vicenza had a Christian community that made use of a Roman building from the first century.…

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